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Archive for category Street signs

Plaque de Rue – French Street Signs

A charming selection of “Plaque de Rue” from a little French town. The names you see on the street signs is written with a classic sans-serif typeface and the signs has different trims, from a classic single white trim to the more fancy green trims with relief effects.

Rue Louis-Blanc 1

Rue Louis-Blanc 1

Rue Rapide

Rue Gambetta

Rue Honoré Euzet

Rue Foneère

Rue de Longuyon

Quai Louis Pasteur

Sortie de Voiture

Rue Frédéric Mistral

Prise D'eau

Gaz a Tous Les Étages

Défense D'afficher

13 Gaz a Tous Les Étages

Rue André Portes

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Porcelain Enamel – A Fascinating Story

Enamel icon of St. George from the 12th century.

Enamel icon of St. George from the 12th century.

Porcelain enamel has been widely used for signs during the last 150 years, but enameling actually dates back over 2000 years.

When you look at the fresh, modern look of an enamel sign it is hard to believe that the art of enameling metal is actually one that has been around for thousands of years. The same techniques that are used to make strong, colorful house plaques, address numbers and door signs have been used by many different cultures to create jewelry and other decorative items.

The process of creating an enamel sign, door sign or house plaque involves placing powdered glass on a metal backing and firing it at a high temperature. At high temperatures the glass will melt and fuse with the background. This creates a surface that is glossy and because the colors are an intrinsic part of the enamel they will not fade or dull over time. This gives them a distinct advantage over signs that are painted or which use other manufacturing techniques but which may be prone to fading or weather damage.

Although porcelain enamel is often placed on a metal backing when creating modern pieces it was not uncommon to find items that had enamel areas on a base of pottery and stone. This is because the act of applying powdered glass to a backing and then firing it could produce a coating that was durable, brilliantly colored and able to handle a variety of different uses. Items that use a metal base often had the advantage of being more durable than an item made from pottery.

Blue Enamel House Number

Blue Enamel House Number

In its earliest history, porcelain enamel techniques were used to create decorative and religious items. In the Middle Ages, it was not uncommon to find items that included the use of precious and semi-precious stones in the design. Some of the most famous enameled decorative items include Faberge eggs which are known for their intricate enamel work and use of precious gems. Many people are familiar with jewelry pieces that use the cloisonné technique which involves the creation of enameled areas that are separated by thin metal wire.

Because porcelain enamel techniques do produce such a glossy, flawless finish it is no wonder that they were used for display items such as signs and address numbers. In the 1850’s, European craftsmen were just beginning to create enamel signs. They soon became very popular and it was not unusual to find them on many houses and businesses in cities throughout Europe. They were expensive and time consuming to produce, however, and slowly the process of hand enameling became rarely used. Modern enameling techniques still involve mixing clear glass powder with small quantities of metal oxides before firing in order to create the beautiful colors which these pieces are known for.

Now, the interest that people are showing in hand enameling is growing again. For anyone who is interested in purchasing a sign or set of house numbers which are beautiful, intricately crafted and extremely durable the choice is clear. Hand enameled signs from Ramsign are designed to add class and beauty to your home while maintaining their color and design for many years to come.

Swedish Porcelain Enamel Signs

These photos of Swedish “emaljskyltar” (Swedish for “enamel signs”) was taken at Stortorget in Helsingborg. Notice how beautifully the blue street signs compliments the old buildings.

emaljskyltar

Stallgatan & Stortorget

emaljskylt

Stallgatan

emaljskylt

Stortoget

gatuskylt

Stortoget

gatuskyltar

Norra Strandgata

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German street signs

Photographed these beautiful classic street signs during a weekend trip in Germany. I really like the deep blue enamel color as well as the classic German typeface.

Tidenweg

Streetsign "Tidenweg"

Streetsign "Dünenweg"

Streetsign "Dünenweg"

Streetsign "Möwenweg"

Streetsign "Möwenweg"

Streetsign "Uchtern Strand"

Streetsign "Uchtern Strand"

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